Showing 342 results

Authority record
Corporate body

Women's Patriotic Association. Trinity Branch (Trinity, N.L.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1914-1948

The Women’s Patriotic Association (WPA) was formed in 1914 by Lady Davidson, wife of the governor of Newfoundland. Its purpose was to provide assistance to men serving overseas and to dependents at home, by knitting garments, preparing bandages and raising funds for materials. The WPA was dissolved in 1921, but was re-formed in 1939 under the direction of Lady Walwyn. The Trinity branch was formed at that time.

From 1939 to 1945 members of the branch made quantities of knitted goods for men serving overseas. The branch remained active throughout the period of the second World War. In 1948 the Association disbanded. Any remaining funds were donated to the Red Cross Society.

Women's Missionary Society

  • Corporate body
  • 1881-1962

The Women's Missionary Society (WMS) of the Methodist Church of Canada had been organized in Hamilton, Ontario, on 8 Nov. 1881. In Newfoundland, in 1882, Rev. T. H. Janes, minister, George Street Church, St. John's, organized the first Auxiliary in Newfoundland with Mrs. John Steer, President, Miss Julia Milligan, Secretary, and a membership of twenty-five.

Other Auxiliaries followed and on 18 Nov. 1915, the Newfoundland Branch was formed. By the time of church union in 1925, the total membership of the organization - Auxiliaries, Mission Circles, Mission Bands, and Little Light Bearers was 4,124.

The Women's Missionary Society brought together in 1925, with Church Union, the Women's Missionary Societies of both the Presbyterian Church and Methodist Church, as well as the Canada Congregational Women's Board of Missions. The aims of the organization were wide-ranging, and involved youth, the community, and overseas mission work.

By 1962 when the WMS and the Woman's Association were disbanded and the United Church Women took their place, the work of the WMS was quite extensive. In addition to the usual office holders, Departments of the organization included Christian Stewardship, Mission Circles, Canadian Girls in Training and Explorer groups, Mission and Baby Bands, Associate Members, Supply, Community Friendship, Literature, Candidate Secretary, Missionary Monthly and World Friends, Christian Citizenship, and Press. Organization of the groups parallelled the organization of the United Church, with Conference, Presbytery, and congregational levels of the WMS.

At Cochrane Street congregation, the organization was part of the church from the beginning. The whereabouts of the majority of the records of the WMS at Cochrane Street are unknown. However, Board documents demonstrate the extensive involvement of the women within the church in this organization. The group at Cochrane Street celebrated their silver (25th) anniversary on 5 Mar. 1924, and continued as an organization until it was superseded by the United Church Women in 1962.

The annual reports of the congregation give a summary of the work of this organization as do the various Boards and Committees of the church.

Women's Association (United Church)

  • Corporate body
  • 1925-1962

Organization of the Woman's Association (WA) dates from Church Union in 1925. However, there were Ladies Aid Societies in many congregations before this time. "The purpose of the organization was to deepen the spiritual life of the women of the Church and to promote a program of Christian fellowship and service, personal evangelism, and stewardship. This was defined as assistance to the local minister, visitation, promotion of Christian education in the home and Sunday school, and general oversight of the furnishing of the manse." (Victoria University Archives, Administrative history of the WA).

Unlike other organizations within the Church, the Woman's Association was first formed on a local congregational and Presbyterial level. The Dominion Council of the Woman's Association was established in 1940, with a full-time Executive Secretary being appointed in 1953.

In 1956, the Council co-operated in the work of the Commission to Study Women's Work and in 1962 the Council was dissolved. This was part of the larger re-structuring of the Church, which saw the demise of the Women's Missionary Society and the Woman's Association and the formation of the United Church Women as the new organization for all women in the Church.

The whereabouts of many of the records of the Women's Association and the previous Ladies Aid Society are unknown; however, the Board and Committee records of the congregation demonstrate the extensive involvement of this organization within the life of Cochrane Street church. The annual reports of the congregation give a summary of the work of the organization until 1962 when it was superseded by the United Church Women.

Wm Dawe & Sons, Limited Collection

  • Corporate body
  • 1928-1961, predominant 1928-1931

Wm Dawe & Sons (William Dawe & Sons, William Daws & Sons) Limited was a woodworking and general building firm located in Bay Roberts, Newfoundland and Labrador. In the 1900s they were the best-known coopers in Bay Roberts and also had a thriving operation in Hampden, White Bay. As well as general barrels, they also made casks and veneers.
The firm was established in 1892 by William Dawe (1845-1928) of Bay Roberts. The son of Mr. and Mrs. Elijah Dawe, he initially worked along side his father in the fishery before opening a woodworking, lumbering and sawmill on his land at Station Road. He married (Mary) Eliza Russell (1865-1932), daughter of Charles and Mary A. Russell, in 1884 and had nine children: Lewis (1890-1949), Wilfred (1892-1963), Augustus (1894-1972), Edward (1897-1972), Frederick (1898-19-?), Myrtis (1902-1984) and Christine (1909-2001)and Chester (1904-2002) and Maxwell (1899-1970), who worked at the St. John’s offices.
Dawe later sold the company to Saunders & Howell of Carbonear. Out of William Dawe and Sons came the firm of Avalon Coal Company Limited in 1919. They started out as wholesale and retail coal merchants but later changed to Avalon Coal and Salt Company. In 1933, a new veneer butter pail, protected by patent right in Canada, was invented by this firm and was used by the Newfoundland Butter Company located in St. John’s. In 1949, the Bay Roberts plant was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt.By 1948, oil was added to the company stock and the named changed again to Avalon Coal Salt and Oil Company. The firm operated the ship M. V. Dawe. It was managed by son Lewis Dawe.
In 1919, Dawe’s sons became partners and a new firm was established, officially becoming incorporated as Wm Dawe & Sons Limited in 1920. Son Wilfred was made managing director and established a veneer and lumber division of the company.
The success of the company lead to a new branch being established at Mudge’s old premises, South Side of St. John’s in 1927. In 1929, son Chester was named manager of this newly opened branch. Having worked mainly in the White Bay operation, he brought his expertise to this extension of the company. Rapid growth forced it to expand and the company purchased the Veil Building on the corner of Water Street and Springdale Street in January 1936. Included in its inventory were “Builders Hardwares” to include paint, varnish, stains, glass, nails, putty, and other building related materials. They also manufactured office furniture, including desks and cabinets, and doors, window-boxes, mouldings and so forth. Their St. John’s offices and showroom was also located here.
By the early 1940s, Chester had separated from the family business and opened his own hardware store in St. John’s in 1945 called Chester Dawe Limited. This firm was acquired by Rona in 2006.
William Dawe died February 16, 1928 and was buried at the Anglican Church Cemetery at Coley’s Point. At that time, his sons took over the various branches of the business. Wilfred was elected president of the firm and Chester and Maxwell headed the St. John’s offices. It went into liquidation in 1964 and was purchased by Malcolm, Edward and Augustus Dawe. It was managed by Augustus until he died in 1972 and Eric N. Dawe became managing director.

William Waterman & Co.

  • Corporate body
  • [186-]-[189-]

The firm of William Waterman & Co. operated as general fish merchants in Fogo, Twillingate, Change Islands, and Nipper's Harbour in Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland from the 1860s to the 1890s. It purchased fish, cod oil, and seal pelts, and provided supplies through its general stores. During the 1870s, Waterman paid more duties than any other merchant operating in the Fogo-Twillingate area, an indication of the extent of its operations. The company equipped 46 schooners for the Labrador fishery in 1880, and 41 in 1890.

William Waterman was an agent and partner in the Twillingate firm of William Cox & Co., which was a successor to the firm originally established by John Slade of Poole in the eighteenth century. In the 1860s, Waterman purchased the firm, which was renamed William Waterman & Co. by 1867. The headquarters of the firm appear to have been at Fogo in the 1870s, but may have been moved to Twillingate around 1887. During the 1870s, the firm was owned in partnership by Thomas Dorman Hodge, Richard Dorman Hodge, William Waterman, and William Edward Waterman.

The Waterman firm may not have survived the 1894 bank crash, for by 1900, much of its property at Fogo and Twillingate was in the hands of J. W. Hodge, who had previously been Waterman's agent at Tilting.

Western Union Telegraph Company (Heart's Content, N.L.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1899-1965

The Western Union Telegraph Company was responsible for the operation of the Heart's Content Cable Station from 1899 to 1965, having acquired all the assets of its predecessor, the Anglo-American Telegraph Company. In 1904, the monopoly of the company expired, but Western Union still maintained the original telegraph systems, including the cable station at Heart's Content. The company remained in control of the station until 1965, when it closed its Newfoundland operation.

Wesleyan Methodist Conference of Eastern British America, Newfoundland District

  • Corporate body
  • 1855 –1874

In 1855 the Newfoundland District of the British Wesleyan Methodist Conference was joined with the districts of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Bermuda and Newfoundland form the Wesleyan Methodist Conference of Eastern British America, retaining in this restructuring their affiliation with the British Wesleyan Methodist Conference. In 1874 the Wesleyan Methodist Church of Eastern British America joined with the Wesleyan Methodist Conference of Canada and the New Connexion Methodist Church of Canada to form the Methodist Church of Canada. The Methodist Church of Canada then became a free-standing body and its direct connection to the British Wesleyan Methodist Conference was severed. The old Newfoundland District became a Conference of the new organisation. For a discussion of the history of the various Methodist bodies in Canada see Neil Semple, The Lord’s Dominion (Montreal, 1996). For a detailed history of the Methodist Church of Canada in Newfoundland and Labrador see D.W. Johnson, Methodism in Eastern British America (Sackville, N.B., 1924).

Welcome To Canada (film)

  • Corporate body
  • 1989

"Welcome To Canada" (1989) is a National Film Board of Canada documentary which tells the story of a group of Southeast Asians who illegally landed on Canada's east coast. It premiered on 28 September 1989 at the Avalon Mall Cinemas in St. John's, Newfoundland. The film was shot at Brigus South, Newfoundland. Called an "alternative drama," it featured non-professional actors, improvised dialogue and documentary camera techniques.

The film was inspired by the rescue of Tamil refuges off the coast of St. Mary's Bay, Newfoundland in 1986. It explored how the residents of a small outport dealt with the arrival of refugees fleeing a country from the other side of the world. Despite obvious differences in language and religion, "Welcome To Canada" illustrated the parallels that exist between these two cultural groups. The film starred Kasivisanathan and Kumaraselvy Karthigasoo, recent refugees from Sri Lanka, and the residents of Brigus South, Newfoundland. The Newfoundland music in the film was performed by local musicians Tickle Harbour with Gordon Quinton, John Lacey, Boyd Norman and Charlotte Bradley.

W.W. Wareham & Sons

  • Corporate body
  • 1922-1967

W.W. Wareham & Sons Ltd. was a fish and fishery supply business operating at Harbour Buffett, Long Island, Placentia Bay, from 1922-1967. It operated successfully until the resettlement program of 1967 forced its closure.

The business was purchased by Wilfred William Wareham, Haystack, from Thomas Wakely in 1922. The firm had originally been established circa 1812 by Thomas Hann, an English merchant who came to Placentia to act as a supplier for the fishery. During its 45 year history, W. W. Wareham and Sons operated mainly as fish merchants, buying fish and supplying fishermen with fishing gear and provisions. They operated bankers in the fishery but did not own any foreign-going vessels. Wareham was a member of the Newfoundland Associated Fish Exporters Limited (NAFEL) and was involved in the salt fish industry, buying fish from the other commuities in the area and selling through the central agency.

As well as the operation at Harbour Buffett where the fish was collected and dried, Wareham's operated a branch at North Harbour, managed by Don Slade, and an office in St. John's managed by Harry Wareham. Other sons of W.W. Wareham, Leeland and Fred, administered the headquarters at Harbour Buffett.

Vestry Committee

  • Corporate body
  • [18-]-

The vestry committee is the body that makes decisions regarding the church building and the congregation. Members of the committee include the church wardens, members of vestry and the rector. The minutes of vestry record discussions and decisions relating to the maintenance of the church, new buildings and additions, and matters concerning the congregation.

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