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Authority record

William Waterman & Co.

  • Corporate body
  • [186-]-[189-]

The firm of William Waterman & Co. operated as general fish merchants in Fogo, Twillingate, Change Islands, and Nipper's Harbour in Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland from the 1860s to the 1890s. It purchased fish, cod oil, and seal pelts, and provided supplies through its general stores. During the 1870s, Waterman paid more duties than any other merchant operating in the Fogo-Twillingate area, an indication of the extent of its operations. The company equipped 46 schooners for the Labrador fishery in 1880, and 41 in 1890.

William Waterman was an agent and partner in the Twillingate firm of William Cox & Co., which was a successor to the firm originally established by John Slade of Poole in the eighteenth century. In the 1860s, Waterman purchased the firm, which was renamed William Waterman & Co. by 1867. The headquarters of the firm appear to have been at Fogo in the 1870s, but may have been moved to Twillingate around 1887. During the 1870s, the firm was owned in partnership by Thomas Dorman Hodge, Richard Dorman Hodge, William Waterman, and William Edward Waterman.

The Waterman firm may not have survived the 1894 bank crash, for by 1900, much of its property at Fogo and Twillingate was in the hands of J. W. Hodge, who had previously been Waterman's agent at Tilting.

William G. Legge

  • Person
  • 1968-1978

Bishop Legge was Curate at Channel and Rector in the parishes of Botwood and Bell Island. He was made Archdeacon of Avalon by Bishop Phillip Abraham. He also served as secretary of the Diocese before becoming Bishop. In May, 1973, Bishop Legge was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Divinity Degree from the University of King's College, Halifax.

William Fitzhugh

  • Person

William (Bill) Fitzhugh was born February 1, 1943, in New York City, New York, U.S.A. He received his post secondary education at Dartmouth College and Harvard University, where he studied anthropology. He presently works with the Smithsonian Institution as the Director of the Arctic Studies Center in Washington.

William Duncan Strong

  • Person
  • 1927, 1928

William Duncan Strong (1899-1962), a native of Portland, Oregon, Dr. Strong attended the University of California at Berkley during the mid 1920's. At Berkley, he studied under Alfred Kroeber, the Chair of the Department of Anthropology at that time. While at Berkley he began to study Ethnography but found that archaeology was his calling. He participated on field trips and did many other things there. His doctoral dissertation got the attention of the Dean of American Archaeologists, Dr. A.V. Kidder. Strong received his doctorate in 1926 at Berkley. In August of 1929, Strong became a Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska. While there he taught classes in Introduction to Anthropology, Primitive Society and Religion and a course on American Indians. On December 15, 1930, Strong resigned from his teaching position to take a position as Senior Entomologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. While there he did some archaeological work but after four years decided he needed a change. In 1937, Strong took a position as Professor of Anthropology at Colombia University in New York. Strong was often described as an effective and a stimulating instructor. Dr. Strong's professional career included service at the Field Museum of Natural History from 1926 to 1929, University of Nebraska from 1929 to 1931, Bureau of American Ethnology from 1931 to 1937, Colombia University from 1937 to 1962. His work with the Field Museum of Natural History allowed him to participate in the Rawson-MacMillan field expedition and traveled to Labrador on the schooner, Bowdoin. He recorded detailed information about the practices of the native groups he encountered on this expedition.

William Duncan Strong

  • Person

William Duncan Strong (1899-1962), a native of Portland, Oregon, Dr. Strong attended the University of California at Berkley during the mid-1920's. At Berkley, he studied under Alfred Kroeber, the Chair of the Department of Anthropology at that time. While at Berkley he began to study ethnography but found that archaeology was his calling. He participated on field trips and did many other things there. His doctoral dissertation got the attention of the Dean of American Archaeologists, Dr. A.V. Kidder. Strong received his doctorate in 1926 at Berkley. In August of 1929, Strong became a Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska. While there he taught classes in Introduction to Anthropology, Primitive Society and Religion and a course on American Indians. On December 15, 1930, Strong resigned from his teaching position to take a position as Senior Entomologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. While there he did some archaeological work but after four years decided he needed a change. In 1937, Strong took a position as Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University in New York. Strong was often described as an effective and a stimulating instructor. Dr. Strong's professional career included service at the Field Museum of Natural History from 1926 to 1929, University of Nebraska from 1929 to 1931, Bureau of American Ethnology from 1931 to 1937, and Columbia University from 1937 to 1962. His work with the Field Museum of Natural History allowed him to participate in the Rawson-MacMillan field expedition and he traveled to Labrador on the schooner, Bowdoin. He recorded detailed information about the practices of the native groups he encountered on this expedition

William Brooks Cabot

  • Person
  • 1899-1910

William Brooks Cabot (1858-19??) was born into a successful merchant and banking family in Battleboro, Vermont in 1858. While still a young man he developed an interest in nature and the outdoors that lasted all his life. Cabot received his schooling in civil engineering at Yale and at Rensselaer, where he graduated in 1881. For the next twenty years he was engaged in an active and successful career, building railroads in the west and bridges throughout New England and New York. He supervised mining operations in Pennsylvania and oversaw many construction projects, including a portion of the New York aqueduct, the subway system under Times Square and, in Boston, the Charles River dam and esplanade. In 1899, a mid-winter vacation trip found him with two Indian guides on a long overland trek to the Hudson Bay post at Lake Mistassini. One of these guides, John Bastian, had travelled extensively through Quebec and Labrador, and probably piqued Cabot’s interest in this part of the world. Between 1900 and 1925 he made annual trips to Labrador and the Quebec North Shore with the intention of living and travelling with different groups of Indians. He spent parts of eight summers (1903-1910) in Northern Labrador among the Naskapi (Innu) and three summers (1921, 1923, 1924) along the Southern Labrador Coast. He “felt passionately that the interior regions of the Quebec-Labrador plateau belonged to the Indians who had long lived there” and probably kept quiet about iron ore deposits he may have encountered in his travels because of a fear that development of the area would destroy their way of life. Although he travelled extensively in the North, he did little to publicize this part of his life beyond a few lectures and a modest publication (Northern Labrador). More than 3000 of his photographs survive in the form of negatives, glass lantern slides and photographic prints, along with his journals,maps and boxes of correspondence. [Source: O Darkly Bright: The Labrador Journeys of William Brooks Cabot, 1899-1910 by Stephen Loring]

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