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Anglican Parish of White Bay, NL

  • Corporate body
  • 1864 -

The Anglican Parish of White Bay is a parish of the Anglican Church of Canada in the Diocese of Western Newfoundland. It began as a mission of the parish of Flower's Cove in 1864. Until 2002, it included the church of St. Peter's, Harbour Deep. From 1964-1975, it included the towns of Williamsporte and Englee.
Churches include:
St. Bartholomew (Jackson's Arm)
The Church of Transfiguration (Sop's Arm)
St. Michael and All Angels (Pollard's Point)
Epiphany (Hampden)
St. Peter (Harbour Deep)

Anglican Parish of the Good Shepherd, Mount Pearl, NL

  • Corporate body
  • 1986 -

On Sunday, April 13, 1986 (Good Shepherd Sunday) a number of people under the leadership of the Rev. Murray Randell, Rector of the Parish of Mt. Pearl, met to form new congregation in the Newtown area of Mount. Pearl. The congregation was named for 'Jesus the Good Shepherd' and the first Worship Service was held on Sunday September 7, 1986 in the Music Room of Newtown Elementary School. The congregation held their Sunday Services in the gymnasium of that school for about 5 years.
On December 2nd, 1990 the cornerstone of the new church building was laid by Rt. Rev. Martin Mate, Bishop of the Diocese of Eastern Newfoundland Labrador. Construction of the new church started in the fall of 1990 and was completed in the spring of 1991. The first Worship Service in the new building was held on Sunday, June 16, 1991. The official opening and Blessing of the new church took place on Sunday, October 21, 1991, presided over by Bishop Martin Mate. On January 1st, 1993 the congregation was given Parish status by the Diocese of Eastern Newfoundland Labrador.
In June 1997, Rev. Whitten was elected Bishop of the Diocese of Western Newfoundland and the Rev. Edward King was appointed Priest of the Parish, where he remained until December of 1998. The Rev. Canon Frank Cluett was then appointed pro-tem until the appointment of the Rev. Robin Barrett as Rector in May of 1999, remaining until the fall of 2008. On January 1, 2009 the Venerable Geoff Peddle became our new Rector.

Arts and Culture Centre. Basement Theatre (St. John's, N.L.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1973-

The Basement Theatre was established in 1973. It was so named because of its location in the basement of the Arts and Culture Centre. The Basement Theatre offers a variety of local professional and amateur dramatic productions, music, comedy, poetry readings and visual art displays. The 75-seat black box theatre is a small, intimate setting for performances of every sort, especially first-time presentations of a play or show designed with a smaller audience in mind.

The Basement Theatre has been a launching pad for many successful shows and has given many new performers, playwrights and production staff a starting point for their careers. The Arts and Culture Centre staff provides assistance to smaller shows in staging, advertising and public relations.

Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Corporate body
  • 1954-

The establishment of the Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland (ARNN) was initiated by members of the Newfoundland Graduate Nurses' Association (NGNA) (1913-1949). Following Newfoundland's confederation with Canada (1949), the NGNA membership approached the Canadian Nurses' Association (CNA) for assistance in organizing a provincial registered nurses' association. The Newfoundland Registered Nurses Act, which established ARNN, was passed in the House of Assembly on 23 May 1953 and became effective in January 1954. Revisions to the act were made in 1970, 1992, 1996, and 1997. In 1999, the name of the association was changed to the Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador (ARNNL).

The 6,000-member ARNNL is responsible for ethical and professional standards in nursing education and practice. It registers nurses in Newfoundland, a function formerly performed by the Newfoundland Department of Health. Its membership consists of all nurses, practising or non-practising, who are currently registered in the province.

ARNNL is governed by a volunteer Council, which is composed of 13 registered nurses elected for a two-year term at the annual general meeting and two consumer representatives appointed by the Minister of Health. Between meetings of the Council, the Executive Committee executes the functions of Council. Chapters may be established by local membership in accordance with guidelines approved by ARNNL.

ARNNL liaises with the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Newfoundland and Labrador Nurses Union, the Newfoundland and Labrador Health Care Corporation, the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association, and the Newfoundland Medical Board. It is affiliated with the CNA, the International Council of Nurses, and the Canadian Nurses Protective Society.

Assumption Parish (Roman Catholic), St. Mary's (NL)

  • Corporate body
  • 1834-

Assumption Parish was established in 1834 and included the communities from Portugal Cove South to St. Vincents. However, Assumption Parish was divided twice. When Holy Redeemer Parish was established (ca. 1845), Portugal Cove South, Trepassey and St. Shotts were separated from Assumption Parish. In 1923, the communities of Peter's River, St. Stephen's, and St. Vincent's were removed from Assumption Parish to create Sacred Heart Parish. Assumption Parish currently includes the communities of Riverhead, Mall Bay, Coot's Pond, Path End, St. Mary's, Point La Haye and Gaskiers, with the parish church at St. Mary's.

The first parish priest assigned to Assumption Parish was Rev. James Duffy. However, priests visited St. Mary's prior to Father Duffy's arrival. Rev. Timothy Browne, for instance, who was stationed at Renews, performed 13 marriages at St. Mary's in 1825 and 1826.

By 1840 Rev. Duffy had established a church and school in St. Mary's; this church was dismantled in 1949 and rebuilt by 1950. Aside from the original school established by Rev. Duffy, a commercial school was opened in 1851. With the arrival of the Presentation Sisters to the parish in 1859, a convent school was established at St. Mary's.

Some of the communities in Assumption Parish also had their own church and school, including Riverhead and Mall Bay, which had a small chapel built sometime between 1895 and 1905 (replaced ca. 1963). Schools were also established in Mall Bay (1944), at the Gulch, Point La Haye (1943) and Gaskiers and Point La Haye (1951).

Parochial organizations in Assumption Parish included the Crusaders of Mary, the Children of Mary, the St. Anne Society and the Holy Name Society.

Avalon Presbytery

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

In 1962 the Presbyteries of St. John's and Carbonear were amalgamated to form Avalon Presbytery. In 1968, a further consolidation took place and Avalon Presbytery was extended to include the territory formerly covered by Burin Presbytery . This was done in order to take advantage of the new network of roads that had been built in the interior of the province.

Within the Presbytery various smaller geographic interest groups or Zones were formed. Of these, the most visible was the St. John's or Metro Zone, whose activities are reflected in the sub-series. In 1985 the pastoral charges in the St. John's area were reconstituted as St. John's Presbytery and were removed from Avalon Presbytery's jurisdiction. Avalon Presbytery was included in the East District at the time of re-organization in 1992.

Avalon Presbytery of the United Church of Canada

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-1992

In 1962 the Presbyteries of St. John's and Carbonear were amalgamated to form Avalon Presbytery. In 1968, a further consolidation took place and Avalon Presbytery was extended to include the territory formerly covered by Burin Presbytery. This was done in order to take advantage of the new network of roads that had been built in the interior of the province.

Within the Presbytery various smaller geographic interest groups or Zones were formed. Of these, the most visible was the St. John's or Metro Zone, whose activities are reflected in the sub-series. In 1985 the pastoral charges in the St. John's area were reconstituted as St. John's Presbytery and were removed from Avalon Presbytery's jurisdiction. Avalon Presbytery was included in the East District at the time of re-organization in 1992.

Baine, Johnston & Co.

  • Corporate body
  • [183-]

Baine, Johnston & Co. was one of Newfoundland's largest mercantile firms in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It engaged in the supply of the inshore and Labrador cod fisheries and was also involved in the fish trade, the offshore seal fishery and the general export-import trade. Branches of the company were established at Battle Harbour (Labrador); Harbour Buffett and Presque (Placentia Bay); Port de Grave and Cupids, (Conception Bay); and Bonavista.

The name Baine, Johnston & Co. emerged in the 1830s and the firm was the successor of a series of companies founded by Scottish entrepreneurs in St. John's in the early nineteenth century. Two of the principal founders were Walter Baine and William Johnston. Baine was originally associated with the Greenock (Scotland) firm Long, Baine & Co. (principals Thomas Lang, Walter Baine Jr., Thomas Patton, John Hamilton, and Archibald Baine) which was involved in the Newfoundland trade at St. John's by 1806. In 1808 Thomas Patten, the managing agent, joined Walter Baine Jr. to form an affiliated company Patten, Baine & Co.

In 1810 William Johnston was appointed as St. John's agent for the Walter Baine & Co. (successor of Patten, Baine & Co.). In 1816 Johnston purchased the St. John's Water Street premises formerly occupied by Hart, Robinson & Co. and in 1818 acquired "Horton's Plantation" between Baird's Cove and Ayre's Cove (where Baine, Johnston & Co. maintained its headquarters until 1963). The firm "occupied" premises in "Cubits" (likely Cupids) in 1818 and purchased Snow's Plantation at Port de Grave from William Andrews, presumably the site of company operations there.

Following the death of Johnston (1837), Walter Grieve became the managing agent of Baine, Johnston & Co. in St. John's and his brother James (a partner) managed affairs in Greenock. When Walter Baine Jr. died in 1851, the Grieves became the principal partners. Walter Grieve, however, left in 1851 to form Walter Grieve & Co., and formed a partnership with Alexander Bremner in Grieve & Bremner at Trinity in 1861.

In 1871 Baine, Johnston & Co. purchased the Slade premises in Battle Harbour, Labrador but retained Slade's former accountant and manager, William Collingwood as their chief agent. When Walter Baine Grieve died in 1921 this effectively marked the end of both the Grieve and the Scottish connections with Baine, Johnston & Co.

In addition to its role in the cod fishery, Baine Johnston & Co. participated in the Newfoundland sealing industry, outfitting vessels for the annual hunt and processing seal oil, pelts and other products; in 1896 the firm purchased a seal processing plant at Harbour Grace, which became the headquarters for its operations. Through its principals, the firm registered nearly three hundred vessels in Newfoundland (1832-1920), making it one of the largest vessel owners in Newfoundland and Labrador; these vessels included the SS Bloodhound, one of the first steamers utilized in the sealing industry. The firm's vessels were also used in the coasting and foreign trades; the company also became the Newfoundland agent for the Cunard Line.

The firm was reincorporated in 1921 with Thomas W. Collingwood, William's son as managing director. By 1939 he had become the major shareholder. Baine, Johnston & Co. had withdrawn from the fishery by 1955. The company has developed and maintains a commercial interest in real estate, insurance, wholesaling and retailing.

Baine, Johnston & Co.

  • Corporate body
  • [183-]-

Baine, Johnston & Co. was one of Newfoundland's largest mercantile firms in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It engaged in the supply of the inshore and Labrador cod fisheries and was also involved in the fish trade, the offshore seal fishery and the general export-import trade. Branches of the company were established at Battle Harbour (Labrador); Harbour Buffett and Presque (Placentia Bay); Port de Grave and Cupids, (Conception Bay); and Bonavista.

The name Baine, Johnston & Co. emerged in the 1830s and the firm was the successor of a series of companies founded by Scottish entrepreneurs in St. John's in the early nineteenth century. Two of the principal founders were Walter Baine and William Johnston. Baine was originally associated with the Greenock (Scotland) firm Long, Baine & Co. (principals Thomas Lang, Walter Baine Jr., Thomas Patton, John Hamilton, and Archibald Baine) which was involved in the Newfoundland trade at St. John's by 1806. In 1808 Thomas Patten, the managing agent, joined Walter Baine Jr. to form an affiliated company Patten, Baine & Co.

In 1810 William Johnston was appointed as St. John's agent for the Walter Baine & Co. (successor of Patten, Baine & Co.). In 1816 Johnston purchased the St. John's Water Street premises formerly occupied by Hart, Robinson & Co. and in 1818 acquired "Horton's Plantation" between Baird's Cove and Ayre's Cove (where Baine, Johnston & Co. maintained its headquarters until 1963). The firm "occupied" premises in "Cubits" (likely Cupids) in 1818 and purchased Snow's Plantation at Port de Grave from William Andrews, presumably the site of company operations there.; Following the death of Johnston (1837), Walter Grieve became the managing agent of Baine, Johnston & Co. in St. John's and his brother James (a partner) managed affairs in Greenock. When Walter Baine Jr. died in 1851, the Grieves became the principal partners. Walter Grieve, however, left in 1851 to form Walter Grieve & Co., and formed a partnership with Alexander Bremner in Grieve & Bremner at Trinity in 1861.

In 1871 Baine, Johnston & Co. purchased the Slade premises in Battle Harbour, Labrador but retained Slade's former accountant and manager, William Collingwood as their chief agent. When Walter Baine Grieve died in 1921 this effectively marked the end of both the Grieve and the Scottish connections with Baine, Johnston & Co.

In addition to its role in the cod fishery, Baine Johnston & Co. participated in the Newfoundland sealing industry, outfitting vessels for the annual hunt and processing seal oil, pelts and other products; in 1896 the firm purchased a seal processing plant at Harbour Grace, which became the headquarters for its operations. Through its principals, the firm registered nearly three hundred vessels in Newfoundland (1832-1920), making it one of the largest vessel owners in Newfoundland and Labrador; these vessels included the SS Bloodhound, one of the first steamers utilized in the sealing industry. The firm's vessels were also used in the coasting and foreign trades; the company also became the Newfoundland agent for the Cunard Line.

The firm was reincorporated in 1921 with Thomas W. Collingwood, William's son as managing director. By 1939 he had become the major shareholder. Baine, Johnston & Co. had withdrawn from the fishery by 1955. The company has developed and maintains a commercial interest in real estate, insurance, wholesaling and retailing.

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