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Authority record

Baggs, John P.

  • Person
  • [19-]

John P. Baggs was a member of the Newfoundland Constabulary. He was stationed at Trinity from 1940 to 1950.

Baggs, Samuel

  • Person
  • 1887-1968

Samuel Baggs (1887-1968), teacher, Methodist/United Church minister, was born in Broad Cove, Bay de Verde, Newfoundland, on 24 June 1887, the son of Archibald and Janet Baggs. He married Laura Lorenzen (sp), of Garnish. They had no children. The Rev. Baggs died on 2 August 1968 in St. John's.

As a teenager, Baggs fished with his father on the coast of Labrador. After finishing school, he accepted a teaching position at Garnish. There he realized he wished to enter the Methodist ministry. He requested a position where he could teach as well as lead in religious worship; he was sent to Indian Burying Place, Notre Dame Bay. In 1912, he became a probationer for the Methodist minstry and served in the Deer Island Charge in Bonavista Bay. He attended Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, in 1914 and graduated with a BA degree in in 1917. He was ordained at Cochrane St. Church in June, 1917.

Rev. Baggs served many pastoral charges, including Newtown/Lumsden (1917-21), Bay Roberts (1921-25), Western Bay (1925-28), Freshwater (1928-30) Blackhead (1930-35), Bay Roberts (1935-1936), Channel, Port aux Basques (1936-44),Twillingate (1944-46) and Channel (1946-56).

In 1934, Baggs was elected Secretary of the United Church Conference, and in 1936, became its President.

Following his retirement from the full-time ministry in 1956, Rev. Baggs served as retired assistant minister at First United Church in Corner Brook (1956-7) and Port aux Basques (1957-62) In 1963 he moved to St. John's where he served as supply minister at Cochrane St. United Church and as summer supply at Grand Falls and Grand Bank.

Baggs was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Divinity degree from Mount Allison University. He was an active member of the Masonic Order and was named Grand Chaplain of the Masonic Order of the English Lodge in 1967.

Baikie, Margaret

  • Person
  • 1844-1940

Margaret (Campbell) Baikie (1844-1940), daughter of Daniel and Lydia Campbell, was born in Mulligan, Labrador on 6 May 1944. She married Thomas Baikie and had eight children. In 1917, when she was 73 years old, Margaret Baikie wrote about her memories of life in Labrador.

Baine, Johnston & Co.

  • Corporate body
  • [183-]

Baine, Johnston & Co. was one of Newfoundland's largest mercantile firms in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It engaged in the supply of the inshore and Labrador cod fisheries and was also involved in the fish trade, the offshore seal fishery and the general export-import trade. Branches of the company were established at Battle Harbour (Labrador); Harbour Buffett and Presque (Placentia Bay); Port de Grave and Cupids, (Conception Bay); and Bonavista.

The name Baine, Johnston & Co. emerged in the 1830s and the firm was the successor of a series of companies founded by Scottish entrepreneurs in St. John's in the early nineteenth century. Two of the principal founders were Walter Baine and William Johnston. Baine was originally associated with the Greenock (Scotland) firm Long, Baine & Co. (principals Thomas Lang, Walter Baine Jr., Thomas Patton, John Hamilton, and Archibald Baine) which was involved in the Newfoundland trade at St. John's by 1806. In 1808 Thomas Patten, the managing agent, joined Walter Baine Jr. to form an affiliated company Patten, Baine & Co.

In 1810 William Johnston was appointed as St. John's agent for the Walter Baine & Co. (successor of Patten, Baine & Co.). In 1816 Johnston purchased the St. John's Water Street premises formerly occupied by Hart, Robinson & Co. and in 1818 acquired "Horton's Plantation" between Baird's Cove and Ayre's Cove (where Baine, Johnston & Co. maintained its headquarters until 1963). The firm "occupied" premises in "Cubits" (likely Cupids) in 1818 and purchased Snow's Plantation at Port de Grave from William Andrews, presumably the site of company operations there.

Following the death of Johnston (1837), Walter Grieve became the managing agent of Baine, Johnston & Co. in St. John's and his brother James (a partner) managed affairs in Greenock. When Walter Baine Jr. died in 1851, the Grieves became the principal partners. Walter Grieve, however, left in 1851 to form Walter Grieve & Co., and formed a partnership with Alexander Bremner in Grieve & Bremner at Trinity in 1861.

In 1871 Baine, Johnston & Co. purchased the Slade premises in Battle Harbour, Labrador but retained Slade's former accountant and manager, William Collingwood as their chief agent. When Walter Baine Grieve died in 1921 this effectively marked the end of both the Grieve and the Scottish connections with Baine, Johnston & Co.

In addition to its role in the cod fishery, Baine Johnston & Co. participated in the Newfoundland sealing industry, outfitting vessels for the annual hunt and processing seal oil, pelts and other products; in 1896 the firm purchased a seal processing plant at Harbour Grace, which became the headquarters for its operations. Through its principals, the firm registered nearly three hundred vessels in Newfoundland (1832-1920), making it one of the largest vessel owners in Newfoundland and Labrador; these vessels included the SS Bloodhound, one of the first steamers utilized in the sealing industry. The firm's vessels were also used in the coasting and foreign trades; the company also became the Newfoundland agent for the Cunard Line.

The firm was reincorporated in 1921 with Thomas W. Collingwood, William's son as managing director. By 1939 he had become the major shareholder. Baine, Johnston & Co. had withdrawn from the fishery by 1955. The company has developed and maintains a commercial interest in real estate, insurance, wholesaling and retailing.

Baine, Johnston & Co.

  • Corporate body
  • [183-]-

Baine, Johnston & Co. was one of Newfoundland's largest mercantile firms in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It engaged in the supply of the inshore and Labrador cod fisheries and was also involved in the fish trade, the offshore seal fishery and the general export-import trade. Branches of the company were established at Battle Harbour (Labrador); Harbour Buffett and Presque (Placentia Bay); Port de Grave and Cupids, (Conception Bay); and Bonavista.

The name Baine, Johnston & Co. emerged in the 1830s and the firm was the successor of a series of companies founded by Scottish entrepreneurs in St. John's in the early nineteenth century. Two of the principal founders were Walter Baine and William Johnston. Baine was originally associated with the Greenock (Scotland) firm Long, Baine & Co. (principals Thomas Lang, Walter Baine Jr., Thomas Patton, John Hamilton, and Archibald Baine) which was involved in the Newfoundland trade at St. John's by 1806. In 1808 Thomas Patten, the managing agent, joined Walter Baine Jr. to form an affiliated company Patten, Baine & Co.

In 1810 William Johnston was appointed as St. John's agent for the Walter Baine & Co. (successor of Patten, Baine & Co.). In 1816 Johnston purchased the St. John's Water Street premises formerly occupied by Hart, Robinson & Co. and in 1818 acquired "Horton's Plantation" between Baird's Cove and Ayre's Cove (where Baine, Johnston & Co. maintained its headquarters until 1963). The firm "occupied" premises in "Cubits" (likely Cupids) in 1818 and purchased Snow's Plantation at Port de Grave from William Andrews, presumably the site of company operations there.; Following the death of Johnston (1837), Walter Grieve became the managing agent of Baine, Johnston & Co. in St. John's and his brother James (a partner) managed affairs in Greenock. When Walter Baine Jr. died in 1851, the Grieves became the principal partners. Walter Grieve, however, left in 1851 to form Walter Grieve & Co., and formed a partnership with Alexander Bremner in Grieve & Bremner at Trinity in 1861.

In 1871 Baine, Johnston & Co. purchased the Slade premises in Battle Harbour, Labrador but retained Slade's former accountant and manager, William Collingwood as their chief agent. When Walter Baine Grieve died in 1921 this effectively marked the end of both the Grieve and the Scottish connections with Baine, Johnston & Co.

In addition to its role in the cod fishery, Baine Johnston & Co. participated in the Newfoundland sealing industry, outfitting vessels for the annual hunt and processing seal oil, pelts and other products; in 1896 the firm purchased a seal processing plant at Harbour Grace, which became the headquarters for its operations. Through its principals, the firm registered nearly three hundred vessels in Newfoundland (1832-1920), making it one of the largest vessel owners in Newfoundland and Labrador; these vessels included the SS Bloodhound, one of the first steamers utilized in the sealing industry. The firm's vessels were also used in the coasting and foreign trades; the company also became the Newfoundland agent for the Cunard Line.

The firm was reincorporated in 1921 with Thomas W. Collingwood, William's son as managing director. By 1939 he had become the major shareholder. Baine, Johnston & Co. had withdrawn from the fishery by 1955. The company has developed and maintains a commercial interest in real estate, insurance, wholesaling and retailing.

Baird, Edgar

  • Person
  • 1910-[19-]

Edgar Baird (b. 1910 ) was a resident of Traytown, Newfoundland, and former owner of a logging company.

Banks, Sir Joseph

  • Person
  • 1743-1820

Joseph Banks (1743-1820), traveller, botanist, naturalist, and geographer, was born on 2 February 1743 in London, England, the only child of Sarah Bate and William Banks. On 23 March 1779, Banks married Dorothea Hugessen (1758-1828), daughter and heiress of William Western Hugessen; they had no children. Banks died on 19 June 1820 at Heston in London.

Banks was educated initially at home by a private tutor, and then at Harrow School (1752-55), Eton School (1755-60), and Christ Church College, Oxford University (1760-63). Unable to study botany at Oxford, Banks engaged Isaac Lyons, from Cambridge, as his private tutor. When his father died in 1761, Banks became a wealthy man in his own right at the age of 18. Five years later in 1766, the 23-year-old naturalist took part in a voyage to Newfoundland aboard the vessel Niger, which docked in St. John's and then Croque, a fishing settlement on the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland, en route to the coast of Labrador. Banks made many notes on local archaeology and natural history, especially ornithological observations.

Banks was one of the most influential men of science in the eighteenth century and as such received a large number of professional distinctions during his career. He was a Fellow both of the Society of Antiquities and the Royal Society. He served as President of the Royal Society from 1778 to 1820, the longest-serving President in the history of the society. As President of the Royal Society, he was involved in the Board of Longitude, the Greenwich Royal Observatory, the Board of Agriculture, and the African Association. He was appointed Special Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew (1773) and Trustee of the British Museum . Banks was appointed to the Privy Council in recognition of his role as a government advisor in 1797. In 1819, the House of Commons selected him as chair of two committees: the Committee to enquire into the prevention of banknote forgery and the the Committee to consider systems of weights and measures.

Banks had a role in most British voyages of discovery in his period. He sponsored William Bligh's doomed expedition from Tahiti to the West Indies on the Bounty in 1789. He organized Matthew Flinders' voyage on the Investigator (1801-3) to begin the mapping of Australia. He was involved in George McCartney's mission to China (1792-94) and with George Vancouver's voyage to the northwest coast of America (1791-95). Banks sent botanists all over the world, including New South Wales, the Cape of Good Hope, West Africa, the East Indies, South America, India, and Australia. Many times these voyages were at his own expense.

Banks established his scientific base at his London home in Soho Square in 1776 and housed his natural history collections there. He made his house and collections open to the wider scientific community. Banks did not differentiate between British and foreign scientists, and he even maintained scientific relations with France during the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars.

Banks was created a baronet in 1781 and was invested Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in 1795.

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