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Corporate body

The Western Union Telegraph Company- Bay Roberts Station

  • Corporate body
  • 1910-1963

The Western Union Telegraph Company (Western Union) was set up in New York in 1851 to construct a telegraph line between St. Louis and Buffalo, New York. Western Union built extensive telegraph lines throughout the United States. In 1910, it set up a cable station at Bay Roberts and contracted with Telcon for the installation of a cable between Hamel, New York and Penzance, England. The first Bay Roberts cable station was a wooden structure on Church Hill. Today, it is a family residence. The structure served the company until a large brick building was completed on Water Street in the spring of 1914. Even from the early days, the operation of cables at Bay Roberts was semi- automatic, and this feature was gradually developed until sometime prior to World War II when the operation of the station became completely automatic, and all the messages passed through Bay Roberts without being touched by human hands. In 1926, Western Union laid “loaded” cables from England to Bay Roberts and from Bay Roberts to New York. In 1928, they laid a “duplexable” loaded cable between Bay Roberts and Horta in the Azores. It is estimated that Bay Roberts provided 75% of the desperately needed North Atlantic cable service given during World War II. Prime Minister Churchill and President Roosevelt had their own private line through this station. There was also a private line between Ottawa and the Canadian Command in Europe.

More than 30 people were employed at the Bay Roberts station at the height of its activity. By 1957, the number of staff was fewer than 20. The last superintendent was Chester Smith who was in charge of the operation when it closed down in 1960 and the building closed out in 1963.

The Western Union Telegraph Company- Bay Roberts Station

  • Corporate body
  • 1910-1963

The Western Union Telegraph Company (Western Union) was set up in New York in 1851 to construct a telegraph line between St. Louis and Buffalo, New York. Western Union built extensive telegraph lines throughout the United States. In 1910, it set up a cable station at Bay Roberts and contracted with Telcon for the installation of a cable between Hamel, New York and Penzance, England. The first Bay Roberts cable station was a wooden structure on Church Hill. Today, it is a family residence. The structure served the company until a large brick building was completed on Water Street in the spring of 1914. Even from the early days, the operation of cables at Bay Roberts was semi- automatic, and this feature was gradually developed until sometime prior to World War II when the operation of the station became completely automatic, and all the messages passed through Bay Roberts without being touched by human hands. In 1926, Western Union laid “loaded” cables from England to Bay Roberts and from Bay Roberts to New York. In 1928, they laid a “duplexable” loaded cable between Bay Roberts and Horta in the Azores. It is estimated that Bay Roberts provided 75% of the desperately needed North Atlantic cable service given during World War II. Prime Minister Churchill and President Roosevelt had their own private line through this station. There was also a private line between Ottawa and the Canadian Command in Europe.

More than 30 people were employed at the Bay Roberts station at the height of its activity. By 1957, the number of staff was fewer than 20. The last superintendent was Chester Smith who was in charge of the operation when it closed down in 1960 and the building closed out in 1963.

The Newfoundland Ranger Force, Battle Harbour Station

  • Corporate body

The Newfoundland Ranger Force, modelled after the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, was formed in 1934 following recommendations from the Brian Dunfield, Deputy Minister of Justice. This new organization would operate from detachments in remote areas while the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary would continue as the regualar police force in the larger towns of the Avalon and Bonivista peninsulas.
As its inception of The Newfoundland Ranger Force was placed under the Department of Natural Resources because the Rangers were to act as game wardens, and also because Justice was a relatively miner portfolio in 1935. The First Chief Ranger was Major Leonard T. Stick, an officer of the Newfoundland Regiment and a veteran of the Battles of Beaumont Hamel and Gallipoli.
The Rangers never numbered more than 72 men at any one time. Recruits were to have a minumum education of Grade XI, making the force somewhat exclusive for Newfoundlanders in the mid 1930s. Trainees were to be in top physical condition, not less than 5'9" in height or more than 189 pounds, single and between the ages of 21 and 28.
Rangers were to be responsible for carrying out the policies of no fewer than six government departments. The department of finance required that they collect custom duties and other fees and act as work commissioners. For the Department of Natural Resources they were responsible for the inspection of the logging camps, the enforcement of game laws, the issuing of licences and organizing and directing the fighting of forest fires. Rangers also acted for
Public Health and Welfare by issuing relief payments, arranging medical treatment and hospitalization when necessary and escorting mental patients to Hospital in St. John's. They enforced criminal law, investigated suspicious deaths and fires in some areas acted as deputy sheriffs for the Department of Justice. For home affairs and Education they acted as truant officers and organized adult education programs. For the Department of Public Utilities, Rangers supervised the maintenence and construction of public roads, wharves and break waters. The Force was effectively a liaison between outports residents and the government which, during Commision Government, acted without political accountability.
The first 30 recruits were sent to Detachments across the Island from Twillingate to Bonne Bay, and Labrador from Hebron to Cartwright. They were given rations for their stay and those going to Labrador were given buillding materials to construct their detachment quarters. Though the first recruits did not finish training until the fall of 1935, by spring of 1936 only the Hebron detachment was still under construction. Transportation of each detachment was on foot, by dog sled or in small boats.
The Rangers were received with mixed feelings into communities which had never been policed and where game and liquor laws were unpopular. The Rangers, who for the most part, had no previous experience in the north, were plagued by loneliness and cultural differences and this presented some problems. The criminal offences that the Rangers dealt with were minor, usually involving liquor and game infractions, common assult and petty theft. As peacekeepers, The Rangers tried to settle problems short of criminal prosecution.
With the outbreak of World War II, some Rangers Joined the Armed forces overseas and shortly after that an order was passed declaring the Rangers and Essential service. The War brought many new duties to the Force including assisting magistries in recruiting others for military service, returned deserters, and enforcing rationing and blackout orders. They also watched for enemy submarines and aircraft in coastal settlements. By 1945, there were nine detachments of the Rangers in Labrador.
Following confederation, the Province decided to dispense with the Ranger Force. They officially disbanded on July 31, 1950 and some of the Rangers joined the RCMP. Former members have helped to preserve the history of the organization through the Newfoundland Ranger Force Association, which was formed in 1968.

The Cartwriter

  • Corporate body
  • 1939, 1940

The Cartwriter was a Cartwright, Labrador community based newspaper.

The Cartwright Courier

  • Corporate body
  • 1968, 1969

The Cartwright Courier was a community based newspaper started in Cartwright, Labrador in 1968.

Terra Nova Presbytery of the United Church of Canada

  • Corporate body
  • 1968-1992

In 1968 the Presbyteries of the Newfoundland Conference were consolidated into three administrative units: Avalon, Terra Nova and Humber Presbyteries. Terra Nova Presbytery was formed from the eastern part of Grand Falls Presbytery and the western part of Bonavista - Burin Presbytery. This was done in order to take advantage of the new network of roads that had been built in the interior of the province.

In 1992 the Conference was divided into two Districts, with the East District taking in Port Blandford pastoral charge and areas east, and the West District including Glovertown and areas west. Terra Nova Presbytery was divided between the two Districts.

Taverner, Gerald Crane

  • Corporate body
  • 1928-2005

Gerald Crane Taverner was born in Montreal on July 19, 1928, to Colin Taverner, originally from Trinity, and Katherine Irene (nee Crane) of Whitbourne, Newfoundland. Educated at Lower Canada College and Le College de St. Cezaire de Rouville, he spent his entire career, over forty years, in the marine shipping world.

Employed at sea for six years, mainly in the West Indies and South America, he came ashore to work in various facets of the industry namely, stevedoring, agency and vessel management activities on the Eastern Seaboard. He later became involved with various shipping operations in many parts of the world, and ultimately took over the day-to-day management of vessels, both owned and time chartered by his employer of that time, Matthew Shipping Co. Ltd.

In 1969, he was invited to join Westshore Terminals, ultimately the largest marine bulk terminal on the west coast of the Americas, as Administrative Manager, arriving in Vancouver in January 1970 to take up the position prior to the commencement of Westshore’s operations in May of that year. Assigned to various management responsibilities, he ultimately held the position of Vice President from 1987 until retirement in May of 1991. Subsequent to retirement his services were retained in the capacity of Advisor to the President for a period of two years.

He later became an enthusiastic genealogist the main thrust of his research being the Taverner family tree. Mr. Taverner passed away in 2005 while residing in Delta, British Columbia.

Sts. Peter and Paul Parish (King's Cove, Bonavista Bay)

  • Corporate body
  • 1815-

Sts. Peter and Paul Parish was initially established in 1815 with its seat located in the community of King's Cove, Blackhead Bay, Bonavista Bay. The majority of settlers arrived in the early nineteenth century after the St. John's merchant James MacBaine had established a major fishing station in King's Cove. The first resident priest was Reverend James Sinnott who was tenured between 1815 and 1832.

The parish boundaries of Sts. Peter and Paul Parish have altered several times in the nineteenth century. Parish records indicate that the parish existed prior to 1815, extending from Fortune Harbour to Heart's Content, making Sts. Peter and Paul Parish the earliest known Catholic parish north of Harbour Grace. In 1872 the parish boundaries reached from Gambo, Bonavista Bay, in the north to Heart's Ease, Trinity Bay, in the south. During the ministry of Reverend Thomas Lynch (1891-1905) the parish included Blackhead Bay and Plate Cove West. In 1966 the boundaries were reduced as Plate Cove East and Plate Cove West became a separate parish.

Schools formed an integral component of Sts. Peter and Paul's parochial organization. Several schools were built during the residency of Reverend Matthew Scanlan (1855-71). Under the supervision of William Veitch (1875-1891) new schools were constructed in every settlement of the parish. School renovations and building continued under Reverend Thomas Lynch and Reverend John Scully in the late 19th and early 20th century. In the mid 20th century a new central high school was built under the supervision of Reverend Frederick Terry.

Pastors that have served Sts. Peter and Paul Parish since Reverend James Sinnott's tenure include: Nicholas Devereaux (1832-1845); Thomas Waldron (1845-54); William Forrestal (1854-?); Dean Cleary (?-1855); Matthew Scanlan (1855-71); John Walsh (1871); William Veitch (1872-73); Michael Hanley (1873-75); William Veitch (1875-91); Thomas Lynch (1891-1905); John Scully (1905-26); William Murphy (1926-40); William J. Williams (1940-56); Frederick Terry (1956-66); James Beresford (1966-74); David Heale (1975-78); Gregory Pumphery (1978-81); Lawrence George (1981-86); M. Walsh (1986-87); Michael Hynes (1987-93); William Houlahan (1993-97); Brian Colbert (1997- ).

St. Thomas of Villanova Parish (Topsail, N.L. : Catholic)

  • Corporate body
  • 1982-

St. Thomas of Villanova was established 15 September 1982 when the Archbishop of St. John's, Alphonsus L. Penney, dismembered St. Edward's Parish (Topsail) to create three new parishes: St. Thomas of Villanova (Topsail); Holy Family (Paradise); and St. Edward's (Kelligrews). St. Edward's Parish (Topsail) was established in 1877 and its original boundaries encompassed the whole of the south shore of Conception Bay. With the erection of St. Thomas of Villanova,however, the communities of Topsail Pond, Long Pond, Three Island Pond, Chamberlains, Manuels, and Topsail became a separate entity (a decree issued by the Archbishop 14 September 1982 transferred the seat of St. Edward's Parish from Topsail to Kelligrews, allowing the former community to become the seat of St. Thomas of Villanova). Assets of the former St. Edward's Parish were proportionately divided among the three new parishes created from the division.

After the erection of the parish in 1982, the church in Topsail, built between 1916 and 1922, underwent a name change from St. Edward's to St. Thomas of Villanova. This building was in use until 1986, when it could no longer accommodate the needs of the parish. A sod-turning ceremony for a new church was held in Powers Court, Manuels, 31 July 1985 and the cornerstone was laid 22 September of the same year. The official opening and dedication of the new parish church and centre, annexed to the Powers Court parish hall, was conducted by Archbishop Penney 25 November 1986.

St. Thomas of Villanova Parish actively supported the parochial schools located within its boundaries St. Thomas of Villanova School and Holy Spirit School (later, High School). However, parish support for these schools ceased after denominational education reforms were passed by the Provincial Government in 1997. They are now secular institutions.

A Steering Committee was established in 1982, shortly after the erection of St. Thomas of Villanova, charged with the responsibility of establishing a parish structure. A Parish Council was formed to administer parish affairs and activities and several committees and sub-committees were struck to aid in this cause, including the Finance Committee, the Building Committee, the Properties Committee, and the Liturgical Committee. In addition, church lay societies, including the Catholic Women's League, the Knights of Columbus, and the PowersCourt Pathfinders, were founded within the parish.

Pastors who have served the parish since its establishment in 1982 include: Gregory Hogan (1982-88?); Patrick J. Kennedy, Administrator (1988?); John Wallis, Administrator ([1988?]); James Doody, Administrator (1991-92); and Charles Hogan, Administrator (1988-1991, 1992-).

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